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Queen Elizabeth’s death and Flashes of Biafran – Nigerian war

Buckingham, poem, Elizabeth
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Buckingham Palace England had in the late afternoon of Thursday September 8th 2022 announced the passage of the British Monarch thus: “The Queen died peacefully at Balmoral this afternoon.

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The king and the Queen consort will remain at Balmoral this evening and will return to London tomorrow”’.

The above was so simple and humbling an announcement of the death of the World’s most powerful and rich Monarch of Great Britain. She ruled Great Britain for 70 years and was head of the Commonwealth of Nations for that amount of time.

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However, before she died, this was how the British Prime Minister Ms. Liz Truss had told the world about the worrying health situation of the Queen: “The whole Country will be deeply concerned by the news from Buckingham palace this lunchtime. My thoughts – and the thoughts of people across the United Kingdom – are with her majesty the Queen and her family at this time.”

Similar emotional sentiments rang out from the White House and offices of Heads of governments from around the World with prayers being offered for “God to save the Queen.”

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But these positive and prayerful wishes for the queen did not sit well with a certain Nigerian born but United States based University teacher Professor Uju Anya who dramatically wished the Queen an excruciating death.

She wrote on her Twitter page thus: “I heard the chief Monarch of a thieving raping genocidal empire is finally dying. May her pain be excruciating.”

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The tweet has since been deleted for violating “Twitter rules”.

Besides, in another tweet, she referenced the rumoured role of the British empire in supplying the Nigerian government with arms and ammunition during the nation’s civil war which spanned 1967 – 1970.

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“If anyone expects me to express anything but disdain for the monarch who supervised a government that sponsored the genocide that massacred and displaced half my family and the consequences of which those alive today are still trying to overcome, you can keep wishing upon a star,” she wrote, following the announcement of the Queen’s death.

Understandably, Professor Uju Anya’s tweets drew the attention of many including Amazon founder, Jeff Bezos, who quoted the post and wrote, “This is someone supposedly working to make the world better? I don’t think so. Wow.”

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Shockingly, the Aide to President Buhari, Bashir Ahmed, also tweeted, “Don’t know that Uju Anya until I saw some of her tweets for the first time on my timeline this evening, her tweets about late Queen Elizabeth II were so unfortunately unnecessary.”

I wrote shockingly because President Muhammadu Buhari’s administration is highly divisive, sectional and nepotistic and so much of his administrative styles are flashbacks of what led to that despicable war for which Professor Uju Anya critiqued in her tweets.

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Another tweep, @novieverest wrote, “You can condemn slavery and colonization without being an Uju Anya. Her statement was terrible and you can’t defend it. It is that simple.”

However, many others defended the Professor for speaking out against the colonial legacy of the British Empire under the late Queen.

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Stating that Anya’s tweets are a reflection of the unspoken sentiments of many, @vickkingsley wrote, “the thing with Uju Anya’s tweet is, a lot of people feel exactly the way she feels but she was bold enough to state even those who feel the same way as she are all dragging her.

Uju Anya is the villain now but you have had massive disdain for the British government, colonialism.”

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“I stand with Uju Anya. The level of sympathy Queen Elizabeth who died peacefully is over, levelling the sympathy given to Africans who died as a result of colonialism because there was no social media,” @Philosophiero1 tweeted.

Carnegie Mellon University, the American institution in which Anya lectures also released a statement distancing itself from the professor’s comments.

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“We do not condone the offensive and objectionable message posted by Uju Anya today on her personal social media account.

“Free expression is core to the mission of higher education, however, the views views shared absolutely do not represent the values of the institution, nor the standard of discourse we seek to foster,” the statement read.

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Writing further about this would require that this writer states clearly that the comments of Professor Uju Anya were inappropriate and not well timed and properly presented.

Also, there is the immediate question about whether the Queen as the Monarch could have influenced the policies churned out by the Prime ministers of that epoch.
Moreover, the Nigerian war coincided with the war over Suez canal between October 29th 1956 to 7th November 1956 which is also known as the second Arab-Israeli war which was the invasion of Egypt by Israel followed by the United Kingdom and France.

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Historically, Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, DL, FRS, RA was a British statesman, soldier and writer who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945, during the Second World War, and again from 1951 to 1955

Anthony Eden, in full Robert Anthony Eden, 1st earl of Avon, Viscount Eden of Royal Leamington Spa, also called (until 1961) Sir Anthony Eden, (born June 12, 1897, Windlestone, Durham, England—died January 14, 1977, Alvediston, Wiltshire), British foreign secretary in 1935–38, 1940–45, and 1951–55 and prime minister from 1955 to 1957.

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James Harold Wilson, Baron Wilson of Rievaulx, KG, OBE, PC, FRS, FSS was a British politician who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom twice, from October 1964 to June 1970, and again from March 1974 to April 1976.

I deliberately went down historical lane to list out the individuals that headed the government of Britain around and about the time that the bloody civil war took place in Nigeria during which time considerable incidents that could be considered as war crimes were committed by the Nigerian side when schools, markets and churches were bombed leading to hundreds of thousands of fatalities made up of children, women and the aged in the then Biafra Republic.

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Unfortunately, the United Nations more than anyone else should be blamed for the apparent silence over these war crimes just as the British Government and not just the the Monarch should be called out.

Also, the accusations made by professor Uju Anya against the queen who has now died can be subjected to a lot of interrogation based on the reality of the situation that the monarch in Britain is only just the head of state but not head of government just as the elected parliament headed by the prime minister or head of government were responsible for carrying out the policies of government.

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So how did professor Anya reached her conclusion?

Besides, as Africans and indeed as Igbo, our culture forbids us from speaking ill of the sick, the dying and especially the dead.

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But basically, in as much as I totally dissociate myself from the views expressed by professor Uju Anya, one objective achieved by her inauspicious tweets on the late Queen Elizabeth of England is that it reignited debates around the propriety, rightness or otherwise of the role played by the government of Britain during the period of that war in Nigeria between 1967 to late 1969.

Also the World’s media are now focusing so much attention on the issues of genocide that took place in Nigeria at that time.

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These debates raging as a result of the tweets by the United States based professor has also compelled some inquisitive minded Nigerian youngsters to trying to ascertain what truly happened to make effort to read broadly on the subject matters of that war.

As is known that successive governments in Nigeria have failed to allow school children have unfettered access to historical accounts of that war.

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Sometime around May 2020, Mr. Innocent Chizaram Ilo who lives in Lagos published a piece in Al Jazeera on what he calls the truth of what happened is denied so we forfeit the chance to learn from it.

The sum total of his essay aforementioned can be presented thus:

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“In Nigerian history books, that period between 1966 and 1970 is called The Nigerian Civil War or The Nigerian-Biafran war. But for those of us whose families lived through it, it is an erasure of truth not to name it The Biafran Genocide

Estimates of the death toll vary – with some putting it at more than one million and others at more than two million. Some died as a result of the fighting but most from hunger and disease after the Nigerian government imposed a land and sea blockade that resulted in famine.

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In The Republic, Amarachi Iheke gives a detailed analysis of the case for and against classifying it as a genocide, arguing that whether or not you believe it to have been a genocide, the conflict exposes “blind spots in our application of international human rights norms” and that “moving forward, as part of a national reconciliation project, it is necessary we embark on critical truth-seeking around Biafra’s genocide claim”.

But the foundations of the Nigerian government’s denial were planted on January 15, 1970, when Biafra agreed to a ceasefire and the war ended. Nigeria’s Military Head of State General Yakubi Gowon declared the conflict had “no victor, no vanquished”.

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“But there was clearly a victor – the Nigerian government, which had regained control of the oil-rich region – and a vanquished – the people of the now-defunct Republic of Biafra, on whose land the war had been fought, whose homes had been destroyed, whose relatives had died of starvation and disease, and their descendants who would have to navigate the world with the weight of their trans-generational trauma”.

“Still, in keeping with Gowon’s mantra, the government began to craft its own story; one echoed in school textbooks.

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In school, I learned no details of what happened in Biafra. The reality was tactfully erased from the curriculum, while those responsible were depicted as national heroes who had fought to preserve Nigeria’s unity.

I tried to reconcile the colourful pictures of these “national heroes” in my Social Studies books (history was removed from the basic curriculum in 2007) with my father’s experience of the war”.

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I must confess that as someone born to Igbo parents who witnessed and participated in that war, I was similarly denied access in school of a properly documented historical accounts of that war.

Just as the aforementioned essayist did stated in his piece published by Aljazeera, most kids from the former Eastern region could only learn about what happened during that war from our parents.

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Then on the side of the British, there have also been a lot of backlash that characterized the support that the British government gave to Nigeria during that war.

Frederick Forsyth is a British journalist who covered the war and he recently authored a piece titled: “Buried for 50 years: Britain’s shameful role in the Biafra war.”

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He wrote thus:

“It is a good thing to be proud of one’s country, and I am – most of the time. But it would be impossible to scan the centuries of Britain’s history without coming across a few incidents that evoke not pride but shame.

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Among those I would list is the creation by British officialdom in South Africa of the concentration camp, to persecute the families of Boers. Add to that the Amritsar massacre of 1919 and the Hola camps set up and run during the struggle against Mau Mau”.

“But there is one truly disgusting policy practised by our officialdom during the lifetime of anyone over 50, and one word will suffice: Biafra.

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“This referred to the civil war in Nigeria that ended 50 years ago this month. It stemmed from the decision of the people of the eastern region of that already riot-racked country to strike for independence as the Republic of Biafra.

As I learned when I got there as a BBC correspondent, the Biafrans, mostly of the Igbo people, had their reasons.

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“The federal government in Lagos was a brutal military dictatorship that came to power in 1966 in a bloodbath. During and following that coup, the northern and western regions were swept by a pogrom in which thousands of resident Igbo were slaughtered. The federal government lifted not a finger to help.

It was led by an affable British-educated colonel, Yakubu Gowon. But he was a puppet. The true rulers were a group of northern Nigerian colonels. The crisis deepened, and in early 1967 eastern Nigeria, harbouring about 1.8 million refugees, sought restitution.

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A British-organised conference was held in Ghana and a concordat agreed. But Gowon, returning home, was flatly contradicted by the colonels, who tore up his terms and reneged on the lot. In April the Eastern Region formally seceded and on 7 July, the federal government declared war.”

“Biafra was led by the Eastern Region’s Oxford-educated former military governor, “Emeka” Ojukwu. London, ignoring all evidence that it was Lagos that reneged on the deal, denounced the secession, made no attempt to mediate and declared total support for Nigeria.

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I arrived in the Biafra capital of Enugu on the third day of the war. In London I had been copiously briefed by Gerald Watrous, head of the BBC’s West Africa Service.

What I did not know was that he was the obedient servant of the government’s Commonwealth Relations Office (CRO), which believed every word of its high commissioner in Lagos, David Hunt. It took two days in Enugu to realise that everything I had been told was utter garbage.

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I had been briefed that the brilliant Nigerian army would suppress the rebellion in two weeks, four at the most. Fortunately the deputy high commissioner in Enugu, Jim Parker, told me what was really happening.

It became clear that the rubbish believed by the CRO and the BBC stemmed from our high commissioner in Lagos. A racist and a snob, Hunt expected Africans to leap to attention when he entered the room – which Gowon did.

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At their single prewar meeting Ojukwu did not. Hunt loathed him at once”. These thoughts of Frederick Forsyth a British is about the same kind of rejection of the role of Great Britain in the Nigerian versus Biafran war.

The Guardian of Britain wrote that “Nigeria is haunted by Biafran war” and averred thus: “Chinua Achebe’s new book There Was A Country: A Personal History of Biafra emerges into this landscape of memory and remembrance, 42 years after the war ended.

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In the book Achebe, a few weeks before his 82nd birthday, finally sets out to tell the story of his Biafra. The format he adopts is novel – involving a rambling mix of anecdotes, summarized histories, analysis, reportage, declamation and haunting poetry. In some ways, reading the book feels like I imagine spending an hour or two chatting with the distinguished novelist might.”

“He roams from the story of how Nigeria came to be, to his schooldays and burgeoning friendships with prominent figures like the poet Christopher Okigbo, whose presence looms large through the book.

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Interspersing the historical account is the story of his father, one of the early Igbo converts to Christianity, and his experiences growing up with newly Christian, trailblazing parents caught between the old traditions and cosmology of the Igbo people and the new Christianity.

The personal glimpses into his early life are hugely enjoyable and indeed tantalizing – often outlined so succinctly, that he leaves the reader greedy for more detail”.

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“Approaching the events leading up to the war – the descent of the first post-independence Nigerian government into an abyss of corruption and misrule; the role that the colonial government played in setting the stage for this descent and the first military coup in 1966 – he acquires a less personal and more straightforward recounting tone.

This continues until the latter part of the book, when he begins to describe the counter-coup of July 1966, the massacres of Igbos that followed the coup, the failed attempts at negotiating peace and the subsequent declaration of independence and the harrowing consequences that followed.”

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“Achebe, as is his right, does not pull any punches, although he does make some concessions to alternative points of view, especially in relation to the legacy of colonialism and the moral imperative on writers to produce committed literature.

He is less conciliatory on the question of whether the actions of the Federal Government of Nigeria during the war constituted war crimes and, possibly, genocide. He is scrupulous in naming the officers and individuals responsible, and where possible provides their viewpoints based on news and other reports.”

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From all these, what has emerged from the controversial tweets of Professor Uju Anya is that in as much as it is uncharitable and inappropriate, the lesson to learn is that there are a whole lot of work that Nigeria needs to do to provide lasting redress to the injustices of the war years and far more to be done by Western powers on the issues around slavery and colonialism.

The ramblings by the special assistant on new media to President Buhari in reaction to Professor Uju Anya’s tweets is totally disjointed, illogical and laughable.

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This is because his boss President Buhari is perhaps the only President of Nigeria that has carried out apartheid and divisive policies against the South that reechoed the wounds inflicted by that war of the late1960’s.

Imaging a President of Nigeria of today who had to borrow over 2 billion USD from China just to build a Railway line to Niger Republic but failing to build same in all of old Eastern region.

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So why is the young boy working for the Octogenarian President Muhammadu Buhari angry that Professor Uju Anya wrote tweets against the British Monarchy for aiding and abetting genocides during the Biafran and Nigerian war when his boss the President has implemented policies that aren’t different from carrying out economic genocides against South East of Nigeria?

Punch newspaper editorial today wrote: “Ahead of the 2023 polls, public attention is riveted on politics. But the electorate’s dream of a better Nigeria appears bleak with the recent embarrassing penchant of state governors and leading politicians to embark on jamborees to London for political meetings.

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Alarmingly, governors, presidential candidates of the leading parties and a former President, Olusegun Obasanjo, jetted to the British capital for a series of meetings.

They abandoned the home front, where insecurity, economic and social crises have rendered life brutish for the majority. A group of elder statesmen have described the trend as shameful.

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Prominent among the London summiteers are presidential candidates of the three biggest political parties. The trio does not currently hold any public office and can rightly claim freedom of movement.

Not so incumbent public office holders. The candidates were in cahoots in London with some state governors; Nyesom Wike (Rivers), Samuel Ortom (Benue), Okezie Ikpeazu (Abia) and Seyi Makinde (Oyo).

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Really, there is nothing legally wrong with travelling to London, especially for private persons. Freedom of movement remains a fundamental right in or out of public office. On deeper interrogation, however, these are meetings where governors whose states face serious challenges at home are seeking personal benefits post-2023 at public expense.

They had nothing to do with their official duties or the welfare of the people. It is embarrassing for a country that is not at war for its leaders to be holding meetings ostentatiously in foreign territories to determine the country’s trajectory…”

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From the Punch newspaper editorial of today, one quick thinking from it is to demand that Professor Uju Anya and millions of oppressed Nigerians should be more bothered about the deplorable situation that Nigeria and Nigerians are subjected under this government of President Muhammadu Buhari and allow the departed Queen of England to take her well deserved peaceful rest.

EMMANUEL ONWUBIKO is head of the HUMAN RIGHTS WRITERS ASSOCIATION OF NIGERIA (HURIWA) and one time National commissioner of the NATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION OF NIGERIA.

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Opinion

Wike’s Rejection Of Atiku Should Be Commended For Equity And Fair Play Matters Arising

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By Osigwe Omo-Ikirodah

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“I beg them today, they should not waste time to suspend me, they should call a National Executive Committee (NEC) – meeting – now and say ‘you are now suspended from the party. Anything you see, you take. They know what I will do.” Nyesom Wike Sep 23 2023.

Rivers State Governor Nyesom Wike’s decision to reject PDP presidential candidate Atiku Abubarkar is no longer news. He claimed that Atiku and his party broke a gentleman’s agreement to return power to the South.

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According to the Rivers State Governor, Atiku can no longer be trusted because of his inconsistencies; he claims the PDP presidential candidate is dishonest, unreliable, untrustworthy, and deceitful. He also slammed Iyorchia Ayu, calling him a “corrupt, arrogant, conceited, racist, power-hungry, anti-southern bigot.”

I’ve heard a lot of people argue for and against Wike’s actions, with some saying he shouldn’t take the roof off the house and others supporting every move Wike makes.

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Some even went as far as saying that Wike has pitched his interest against the North and must suffer a backlash from his actions, fearing that the North would annihilate him.

The first question that came to mind was, “What is the North’s interest?”

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The truth is that it is in the North’s best interests to relinquish power to the South; having a single region rule at the villa for 16 years back to back is nothing more than injustice and a violation of fair play rules.

Imagine the Ijaw men staying at the villa for 16 years stretch ; this portends that a single tribe will take over the running of the villa and, by extension, the country by DEFAULT.

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I am from Edo State, so if I were to be elected president, there is a good chance that most of my advisors would be from the region of the South-South where I grew up, this is what we call by DEFAULT.

No one wants to work with people with whom they are uncomfortable, so what we call NEPOTISM in Nigeria is sometimes done by DEFAULT.

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Read Also #NBA: How Kashim Shettima Outsmarted Peter Obi And Atiku With His Dress Code And Eloquent Presentation Matters Arising

The childhood friend I appointed goes on to recruit his own childhood friends as aides, allowing the majority of his geopolitical zone to gain closer access to him, this again is by default.

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Fortunately for us, Tinubu grew up with people from all tribes and regions, which was reflected in his cabinet when he was Lagos State Governor.

Since Northerners actually believe in fair play and a national quota system that rotates the presidency in favor of all regions, it is no longer in the North’s best interest to hold onto power for another eight years.

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The APC northern governors are Tinubu’s candidacy heroes because they insisted that power must go back to the South, they stood up for truth and fair play.

Read Also Obi No Get Certificate? INEC Throws More Spanners As Electoral Body Reveals Tinubu, Atiku Others Certificate Status

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Even Wike admitted as much when he stated that the APC Northern governors are more organized in terms of demanding fairness and equality than the PDP as a party.

Wike is fighting a battle for justice and fair play, and he is fighting for a party that has purposefully taken a full region, the South, for granted. “Injustice Anywhere Is A Threat To Justice Everywhere”.

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Wike should be applauded not only by the APC, but also by the general public, because of his ideology of sticking to the truth and ensuring that it prevails.

You may not agree with his style or his loquacious mouth, but you “hypocritically” agree with his spending money on the same party while its presidential candidate was in distant Dubai attending to his self-interest and saving his own money to secure the party’s ticket on election day at the expense of fairness.

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Wike has exposed the PDP presidential candidate and done significant damage to his reputation in the last few days, which the average voter ought to be fully cognizant of.

The Economist Intelligence has hinted that Tinubu will win the upcoming presidential elections, which highlights the legitimacy of Wike’s actions.

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The APC and Tinubu would benefit if the governor of Rivers State supported a different party instead of the PDP.

If Wike supports the LP or any other party other than the APC, it will deplete Atiku’s vote and give the APC an advantage, and if Wike finally joins forces with the APC, which all indications point to, the election will be won before February next year.

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Wike, in my opinion, is a potential APC hero for revealing the mask behind Atiku’s presidency.

My Name na Osigwe Omo-Ikirodah and na me b the Chairman and CEO of Bush Radio Academy.

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Opinion

On Queen Elizabeth’s Funeral Service: Observations and lessons for Africa

Queen
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By Obi Chindo

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The ‘whole world’ was present in the Queen’s burial service. Significantly, all the world leaders, political and religious heads from all over the world and from all walks of life were seated accordingly before the service began.

I observed there was no poster of the deceased queen, no order of service except that provided by the church, no sackcloth by the family of the queen (at least to identify her immediate family) and no Ashoebi for Queen’s family, well wishers and relatives.

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The service was solemn and interestingly soul-mellowing. There was orderliness and organization. The military parade and match by the royal navy and others was nearly perfect and a top notch. They displayed expertise in the highest level.

Her children, grand and great grand children were all composed and comported, calmly sitted and flowing with the tempo of events. No stress on their faces as a result of running around for their mother’s burial.

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The singing of hymns, chanting of psalms and canticle were like voices of many waters. There was no shouting, no noise, no repetition of words like ‘Praise God!’ ‘Hallelujah! Amen! Sons of the living God! Shout a big Hallelujah!

The homily which was delivered by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Most Rev’d and Rt. Hon Justin Welby did not last more than ten minutes. His opening prayer was less than ten seconds and he didn’t even say closing prayer. In fact I didn’t know he had finished preaching.

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As a burial service that had many world leaders in attendance including muslims and other unbelievers, I expected a salvation message from the Archbishop so that those men will hear the true word of God for once. But no!

He didn’t even make reference with emphasis to any scripture let alone calling for altar call for those who wanted to give their lives to Christ. I expected the preacher to tell us more about the dead queen, her life and times but he didn’t do that.

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No recognition of dignitaries in the service by the Archbishop of Canterbury. No special greetings whatsoever by the family of the bereaved. No collection of offering. No launching and fund raising in the burial service in support of the church. No announcement on where guests and visitors will be served food.

They knew why they gathered, did that exactly and dispersed. Altogether the service lasted an hour. No time for frivolities. Everything was well ordered and arranged. Her palace was not repainted to look new to the visitors. No gunshots were heard. No masquerade.

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Lessons:

If as Africans we have nothing to learn from the queen’s burial, we must learn simplicity and avoid unnecessary wastage of finance and time during burials. We must discourage extravagant display and waste of resources during burials.

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The church has a vital role to play in reducing a lot of financial burdens placed on people who are bereaved of their loved ones. Insisting that the family of the deceased should pay a certain amount of money before burial is not in the best interest of the church.

If we don’t redefine our concept of Christianity in Africa as simple, accommodating and devoid of ostentation we may continue to lose membership. We must leave Christianity as simple as it is meant to be where everyone is treated equally with love.

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‘Giving honour to whom honour is due’ is good but it must not override our sense of duty and consciousness of time in a public worship. It must be closely watched to avoid eventual shift of our attention to human worship.

We must resist the temptation of raising money in church services when we see political money bags and dignitaries, more especially during burials and other services that are not originally intended for fund raising.

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Rev’d Fr Obi Chindo: Prolocutor for the Poor and the Marginalized

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Opinion

Good governance key to substantial change in Nigeria—Boniface

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A young advocate for good governance, Boniface Ogunti, expressed concern over the welfare of Nigerians and Africans ingeneral, as he maintained that good governance remains the key to effect positive and sustainable change the people yearn for, including other issues he spoke about with Kayode Sanni Arewa

Boniface. It’s so great to have you here. Thank you for being with us today. Can we have your bio data; dob, tribe, schools attended, local government area and other personal data?

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Boniface Ogunti is 26years old and was born February 18th,1996. I am a Nigerian Liberian who was born and brought up in America, I went to Park center highschool, North Hennepin College in Minnesota

There aren’t many billionaires like Boniface Ogunti, who are both humble about their origins and committed to inspiring future billionaires. Tell us about what inspires you and generally about yourself?

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I am not considered a billionaire in America but I am considered a Multi Millionaire. What inspires me is knowing where I came from, to make it out of where I came from you gotta be very creative. to be successful where i came from you had to be from a rich family or you played sports in America as i was an African being raised in America. I had to get around the right people for me to succeed Because my environment was set up for me to fail. That is why I am so committed to inspiring people who want to be successful because I know what it feels like .

Over time we have watched your business grow. Can you share your success journey with us? How many employees do you have currently?

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I started out in Ecommerce, selling products on social media and I was able to generate over a million dollars in sales by unique advertising skills.. When I realized I had a unique advertising skill, I knew I had to capitalize on it, which led me to create my first company called “Current9” . Current9 business module was to help the everyday workers become their own boss by providing online workshops teaching these unique advertising skills so they can their businesses. Current9 became a global movement, i decided i had to give back to my Motherland “Africa” by creating “Ogunti Group” which resonates with where i come from. The Ogunti Group was created for investments and partnerships which I have been able to achieve, as I am in partnership with the Liberian government by providing trucks to transport Iron Ore and Palm Oil to other neighboring countries. Current9 has transitioned into “Circle Of Success” which now does educational/marketing events, empowering everyday people and entrepreneurs as a community of like minded individuals. i have currently have about 80 employees across all my businesses

We watched a video earlier where we learned a little bit about digital marketing and business growth, which we’ll speak about towards the later half of the interview, but we saw there that you are such a supporter and such an advocate of entrepreneurship, which isn’t really a surprise because of your ideology to life, but I’m curious to know how and why you decided to build businesses around digital marketing at a young age, what influenced you and impacted your journey?

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As I was growing my business there were a lot of different Challenges i faced, atimes i felt discouraged to continue because I didn’t have all the required skill sets I have today. What kept me going was my principles I live by, which is; Know thyself, appreciation, relationship management, Mastering the basics..

What were some of the challenges that you faced during that time, and which leadership principles did you stay rooted in as you were guiding this process?

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Can you give us the summary of your business journey; the challenges and the triumphs?

Seeing that you’ve set a standard in training people on how to build a successful business, and more people are coming to you for mentorship, do you ever worry that people will be disappointed?

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I never worry about being disappointed as a Mentor because everyone has a current self and desired self and I KNOW that everyone is going to do a lot better than by themselves, due to the way my mentorship programs are built, you can never live the way you came .

What is your real mission in life and would you say you are getting there?

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My Real mission in life is to do whatever God sent me here to do and to impact as many people God wants me to impact

Tell us about your future plans for Current9.com and the achievements so far?

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So Current9.com is now Circleofsuccess.com which like i said earlier is a community of like minded individuals who are ready to become their own bosses and we at Circle of Success are here to help them achieve this goal. Our achievements so far has been that we have helped numerous people become financially free and independent

If you are made the president of your country, what are the first five things you would address and why?

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if i am made the President of my country the first thing i would do is create s Structure of Governance, build Infrastructure and empower Entrepreneurs because without a proper structure of Governance there can never be any real or substantial change in a country, then infrastructure can come and empowering entrepreneurs is an investment in society as a whole

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