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Econony

Dollar “kasala”: CBN to raise BDC’s share capital to N2bn

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By Kayode Sanni-Arewa

The Central Bank of Nigeria is considering increasing the share capital of Bureau De Change operators to N2bn and N500m for Tier 1 and Tier 2 licences.

The currency operators were previously charged N35m for a general licence.

This was contained in the draft paper of a “Revised Regulatory And Supervisory Guidelines For Bureau De Change Operations In Nigeria” published by the apex bank on Friday.

The new guidelines contain several new changes to the guidelines for BDC operations in the country and if endorsed will be effective at a date decided by the CBN.

Recently, operations of the currency operators have suffered heavy backlash following the free fall of the naira against the dollar.

Government officials have severely blamed the black market operators for this fall though liquidity remains a huge challenge.

This week, operatives of the Economic and Financial Crimes Commision arrested over 250 BDC operators in Abuja and many more in other states of the federation.

Under the minimum capital requirements, the central bank is introducing a two-tier license for BDC operators in the country.

The guidelines read, “A Tier 1 BDC is authorised to operate on a national basis can open branches and may appoint franchisees, subject to the approval of the CBN.

“A Tier 1 BDC (which is the franchisor) shall exercise supervisory oversight over its franchisees. All franchisees shall adopt their franchisor’s name, branding, technology platform, and rendition requirements.

“Also, a Tier 2 BDC is authorised to operate only in one state or the FCT. It may have up to three locations – a head office and two branches, subject to approval of the CBN. It is not permitted to appoint franchisees.”

“Under Tier 1, operators are expected to have N2bn as minimum share capital while also depositing a Mandatory Caution Deposit of N200m.

The application and licence fee is also N1 million and N5 million respectively.

“Under Tier 2, operators are expected to have N500 million as minimum share capital while depositing a Mandatory Caution Deposit of N50 million. The application and licence fee are also N250,000 and N2 million respectively.”

The apex bank also stated that the prescribed minimum capital of BDCs and any subsequent capital injection shall be subject to verification by the CBN.

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Econony

Naira Depreciates Against The Dollar Again

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The Naira, yesterday, depreciated to N1,105 per dollar in the parallel market, from N1,100 per dollar on Tuesday.

Recall that it was earlier reported that the Naira declined to ₦1,100 per dollar in the parallel market on Tuesday, from ₦1,080 per dollar it traded the previous day.

Reports revealed that the Naira also depreciated in the Nigerian Foreign Exchange Market (NAFEM) to ₦1,148.14 per dollar.

However, despite depreciating to N1,105 on Wednesday, it appreciated in the Nigerian Foreign Exchange Market to N1,072.74 per dollar.

Data from FMDQ showed that the indicative exchange rate for NAFEM fell to N1,072.74 per dollar from N1,148.14 per dollar on Tuesday, indicating N75.4 appreciation for the naira.

Consequently, the margin between the parallel market and NAFEM rates narrowed to N32.26 per dollar from N48.14 per dollar on Tuesday.

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Econony

Nigeria’s FX reserves drop to $32bn, lowest in six years

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Nigeria’s foreign reserves fell to $32.29 billion on April 15, the lowest in over six years.

According to the latest data from the Central Bank of Nigeria, CBN, the reserves moved from $34.44 billion, the highest level in 2024, to $32.2 billion on April 15.

The foreign reserves dropped by $2.15 billion or 6.26 per cent.

This brings to an end, a period of steady increase between February 5 and March 18, when the FX reserves rose by $1.28 billion.

CBN had attributed the growth to increased remittance payments from Nigerians abroad and heightened interest from foreign investors in local assets, including government debt securities.

The last time the foreign reserves stood at this level ($32.29 billion) was on September 9, 2017, when the CBN reported N32.28 billion.

The decline in foreign reserves comes amid CBN’s intervention in the parallel market in a bid to crash the FX rate.

On February 27, the apex bank allocated $20,000 to each bureau de change (BDC) operator at the rate of N1,301/$, while the second tranche of $10,000 was sold to the BDCs at the rate of N1,251/$.

On April 8, the apex bank began the third tranche of sales to BDCs at N1,101/$.

Amid this intervention, the naira appreciated against the dollar in the parallel market, moving from N1,900 per dollar on February 21, to N1,100/$ on April 13.

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Econony

SEE Black Market Dollar To Naira Exchange Rate Today 17 April 2024

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Black Market Dollar To Naira Exchange Rate Today 17 April 2024 Can Be Accessed 👇

The official naira black market exchange rate in Nigeria today including the Black Market rates, Bureau De Change (BDC), and CBN rates. Please note that the exchange rate is subject to hourly fluctuations influenced by the supply and demand of dollars in the market.

As of now, you can purchase 1 dollar at a certain rate now, however, it’s important to keep in mind that the rate can shift (either upwards or downwards) within hours.

 

What is the dollar-to-naira black market exchange rate?

The local currency (abokiFx) opened at ₦1,115.00 per $1 at the parallel market otherwise known as the black market, today, Wednesday, 17 April 2024, in Lagos Nigeria, after it closed at ₦1,110.00 per $1 on Tuesday, 16 April 2024.

Dollar to Naira (USD to NGN) Black Market Exchange Rate Today
Buying Rate ₦1,050
Selling Rate ₦1,100
How does the black market dollar-to-naira exchange rate compare to the official rate?

The official exchange rate of the US dollar to the Nigerian naira, as of today, 17 April 2024, is ₦ 1,161 per US dollar.
This is the rate that the CBN uses for its transactions and interventions in the foreign exchange market. The official rate is also the basis for the exchange rates of other foreign currencies, such as the euro, the pound sterling, and the Chinese yuan.

The difference between the black market rate and the official rate is called the parallel market premium. The parallel market premium indicates the degree of divergence between the official and unofficial markets, and reflects the level of confidence in the naira and the CBN’s policies.

Disclaimer:We do not set or determine forex rates. The official NAFEX rates are obtained from the website of the FMDQOTC. Parallel market rates (black market rates) are obtained from various sources including online media outlets. The rates you buy or sell forex may be different from what is captured in this article.

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